Sports Therapy Community Streamed

Ep10 The side of nutrition we don’t talk about - Ste Smith

November 01, 2020 Kristian Weaver Season 1 Episode 10
Sports Therapy Community Streamed
Ep10 The side of nutrition we don’t talk about - Ste Smith
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Sports Therapy Community Streamed
Ep10 The side of nutrition we don’t talk about - Ste Smith
Nov 01, 2020 Season 1 Episode 10
Kristian Weaver

In this episode I talk with Ste Smith about how Sports Therapists can implement better nutritional strategies to support injured athletes.

If you want to Become An Unstoppable Sports Therapist then visit: 

www.sportstherapycommunity.co.uk
 
To find out more about Ste Smith:
Email:
[email protected]
Instagram:
@stephen__smith
Twitter:
@stephensmithPN

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode I talk with Ste Smith about how Sports Therapists can implement better nutritional strategies to support injured athletes.

If you want to Become An Unstoppable Sports Therapist then visit: 

www.sportstherapycommunity.co.uk
 
To find out more about Ste Smith:
Email:
[email protected]
Instagram:
@stephen__smith
Twitter:
@stephensmithPN

Kristian Weaver:

Welcome to the sports therapy community streamed the place where sports therapy practitioners can get useful and actionable advice from industry leading experts from sports medicine to psychology to business. Here is your host sports therapist, exercise physiologist, and creator of the sports therapy community, Kristian Weaver. How often do you consider your athletes nutrition when they get injured? Hello and welcome to this podcast with Ste Smith. Today we're going to be talking about how we can implement better nutritional strategies to support injured athletes. So Steve, tell us who you are and what you do?

Ste Smith:

Hi Kristian first of all, thanks for having me on. It's always good to talk to you and discuss nutrition. Um, so as you probably guessed, I'm a sports nutritionist, I'm just finishing up my PhD in exercise physiology, nutrition. But essentially I'm a sports nutritionist. I work with, you know , different athletes from cyclists, runners, triathletes, and quite a few motor sport athletes as well.

Kristian Weaver:

Excellent. And so obviously as sports therapists, we're expected to know everything about our athletes, especially when they get injured and they come to see us. And we are often required to give them some form of advice around their nutritional strategies, how they can put themselves in the best position moving forward with an injury. So what's the evidence currently suggesting for how we deal with these athletes?

Ste Smith:

Well, obviously as you know , after an injury, your body sort of goes through several stages of healing. Now, one of the first stages is this inflammation stage. And initially people think they should, you know , try and address that inflammation with antiinflammatories. And there's obviously a place for that, but essentially that, that inflammation is, is a really important part of the healing process. You see. So what we want to find there is not necessarily dumb it down so much, but trying to support a little bit. And now we can do that , um, with , with several things are what we want to make sure is that we get our protein right, okay . And then other things like antioxidants, you know, these, these sorts of nutrients that are found in fruits and vegetables. We want to make sure we're getting plenty of them in . One thing I like to tell the athlete , um, you know, with all the diet, not just while we're talking about injury here , but essentially we want to tell them to eat their rainbow. So making sure they get in plenty of different colors on their plate in each meal or throughout the course of the day. So they're getting a good range of vitamins and minerals throughout the day.

Kristian Weaver:

Excellent. And so do we have to put that into some form of food plan or do we sort of do we let an athlete pick and choose what they like to eat?

Ste Smith:

Really I just let them choose what they want to eat and just making sure that you push that that message of getting a wire very tight . And now essentially what we're looking for is we're just trying to support, that recovery process, I don't mean , um, you don't necessarily have to start looking to supplementation with antioxidants, but just making sure you're getting them there from the food. Now, once you've got that area covered in terms of making sure that they're getting plenty of antioxidants in the diet in the acute phase after the injury, especially if it's a soft tissue injury, these tissues, tendons, ligaments, cartilage, they're quite dependent on their collagen rich extracellular matrix. Okay. So, so to cut a long story short, essentially what we have to do is try and support the rebuilding of these tissues. Now essential amino acids and particularly proline and glycine, these are really important to that process. Now any source of really good protein source with , with a wide range of essential amino acids, will contain , um , certain amounts of these amino acids. But this is where we can really put a good intervention in place because gelatin is really high in these , uh , in these amino acids. And there's a little bit of evidence coming out and that's , that's been published by some really good researchers, Keith Barr that showed that just 15 grams of gelatin , um , infused with vitamin C because vitamin C is quite important for that collagen synthesis as well. So 15 grams of gelatin with Vitamin C, say about an hour before some source of stimulation , um , has been shown to help with damaged ligaments and tendons.

Kristian Weaver:

Okay, great. And I suppose we could apply that, as you said, like cartilage type injury. So think about any meniscal type injuries, any of those kinds of structures in the body, then we should be considering that as a potential nutritional strategy for our athletes. So as we move forward then and we've got these patients who could be longterm injured or chronic type patients, then should our nutritional strategy be different for them?

Ste Smith:

I guess with this sort of thing, once an athlete has been injured as a nutritionist, I always look back at their record, are they someone who is consistently getting injured? You know, is it quite common for them to be injured? And why do we look at that? It might just be that they're consistently not eating enough in total. They're not giving their body enough energy to support that exercise. Now as we know that that can lead to um, certain ill effects in terms of bone health, you know, they might be , um, they might be susceptible to stress factors, for example. The first thing we need to look at is if, if it's something that they're consistently being injured, what's their energy and take. Like you can then start looking at the range in their diet. Looking further down the long term with sports nutrition I was, I've always been taught by some of the good guys at LJMU we need, first of all we need to do no harm and if the athlete, if if something can benefit the athlete in the long term then we should consider it. Right? So long term I try to factor in nutritional interventions that could offset injuries that could help prevent injuries. So we make sure that the athlete is getting enough energy, make sure that the athlete is getting enough calcium. And then even now starting to bring in days where we , we supplement them with collagen or longer term, give them plenty of recipes with foods that are high in gelatin. So, you know, making them get, ask them to make their own jelly. Um, even things like bone broths can be can be quite useful. The problem with bone broths, we don't actually know how much I'm jealous and is in them, but again, we could see this a cumulative effect. You see. So, you know , in terms of a short answer to what I've just said, again, it's not a case of we don't know because there's no evidence that, you know , the actual research into injured athletes is very, very scarce. There's no intervention studies because no one's going to volunteer themselves to be injured. So long term I try to periodize nutritional interventions to help prevent injury. You know , if they're going through particularly high training load, that's when I start bringing in gelatin supplementation. Maybe some calcium just, you know, obviously prevention is better than cure.

Kristian Weaver:

Great. And I think there's some important points which sports therapists can take from that. If I could ask you to five things that you'd ask a sports therapist to consider when assessing an athlete's nutritional intake, what would they be?

Ste Smith:

First things first. Just need to make sure you cover the basics. Okay. Are they getting a good wide range of fruit and veg in their diet? Okay . Are they eating the rainbow? Are they getting plenty of protein? Okay, so firstly this one , just make sure that we're doing the basics rates and we're not trying to adhere to one of these, you know, extreme is probably a little bit too much of a word, but one of these restrictive diets, you know , are they restricting their carbohydrate for no reason? Are they, you know, if they're vegetarian or vegan, we need to make sure that they're obtaining some of the nutrients and vitamins that are being shown to be deficient in these sorts of diets. So firstly, make sure that the basics are covered. Secondly, make sure that they're getting enough energy. Okay. That day to day energy needs needs to be sufficient to support that training. Obviously there's times where we manipulate energy intake to maybe lose a little bit of weight, but generally to support that training, we need to make sure that they're getting enough energy day-to-day after that. Again, just making sure you get protein. Okay. One of the things I've always teach my athletes is making sure to follow the three T's . Okay. So we've got total making sure that their daily total is sufficient, ranging from around two to 2.2, maybe 1.8 depending on the athlete . So about 1.8 to 2.2 grams per kilo of protein per day in terms of type. So we've got total type and timing. Okay. Type. Make sure that the good quality protein source is high leucine . So these are things like way chicken, beef, fish, vegetarian sources, things like soy or tofu . And then make sure you're getting your timing right. Okay. So we want to make sure that we're getting some protein and post exercise . If the athlete does fasted exercise in the morning, for example, we want to make sure that we probably provide them some protein prior to that . Okay. Just to support that muscle tissue. Um , but also just put a little bit of energy and before they go out and do this exercise, so make sure the basics are right . Energy intake proteins, okay. That it's quality carbohydrates. Okay. Making sure that we're getting good unrefined carbohydrates, high in dietary fiber. Okay. So essentially what we just want to do thre is, you know, make sure that the athlete is getting plenty of fiber in their diet as well. Again, good healthy fat sources, making sure that we're getting plenty of fish and Omega-3 and then last but not least, making sure that they are getting plenty of vitamin D and vitamin K, C and calcium. Okay. So these are just foods that can help support that college synthesis. Okay. So first of all, you know, vitamin D, we've seen the evidence that the majority of people are insufficient to make sure that is covered. And then veterans stay in college , uh , for that college and synthesis. And then calcium obviously to support that bone health.

Kristian Weaver:

Great. And there's loads of information there Ste so that's why I refer people out to you. Obviously sports therapists aren't expected to be nutritionists, however they do need to have a grasp of the fundamentals of what goes on within an athlete's diet because they might be getting athletes coming to see them who were explaining these kinds of things. So that's really important information. So thank you for sharing that. If people want to reach out to you and ask you about more information, where can listeners find you?

Ste Smith:

Yeah, so I'm on Twitter @stephensmithPN. Um, they can email me if they want. So my business email is [email protected] .uk. Um, or so they can just send me a message through Twitter or Instagram as well. @Stephen__smith.

Kristian Weaver:

Excellent. Ste, thank you very much for being on the podcast. I'll make sure that all your contact details that you've listed there in the show notes as well so people can find you and obviously the members of the sports therapy community can find your supplement guide ebook in the member resources section as well. So, thanks for coming on and hopefully have a nice evening.

Ste Smith:

Good to speak to.

Kristian Weaver:

Join the most powerful and professional network specifically for sports therapists, visit sportstherapycommunity .co. uk.