Sports Therapy Community Streamed

Ep3 How every Sports Therapist can have a brand - Megan MacNeill

June 01, 2020 Kristian Weaver Season 1 Episode 3
Sports Therapy Community Streamed
Ep3 How every Sports Therapist can have a brand - Megan MacNeill
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Sports Therapy Community Streamed
Ep3 How every Sports Therapist can have a brand - Megan MacNeill
Jun 01, 2020 Season 1 Episode 3
Kristian Weaver

In this episode I speak with Megan MacNeill, who talks us through developing your personal brand as a Sports Therapist.

If you want to Become An Unstoppable Sports Therapist then visit: www.sportstherapycommunity.co.uk

Find out more about Megan here:
Website: www.relevantbusiness.com.au

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode I speak with Megan MacNeill, who talks us through developing your personal brand as a Sports Therapist.

If you want to Become An Unstoppable Sports Therapist then visit: www.sportstherapycommunity.co.uk

Find out more about Megan here:
Website: www.relevantbusiness.com.au

Kristian Weaver:

Welcome to the sports therapy community streamed the place where sports therapy practitioners can get useful and actionable advice from industry leading experts from sports medicine to psychology to business. Here is your host sports therapist, exercise physiologist and creator of the sports therapy community, Kristian Weaver. Hello and welcome to this episode with Megan McNeil. Today we're going to be talking about personal branding . So Megan , can you tell us who you are and what you do?

Megan MacNeill:

Thanks so much for having me. I'm Megan McNeil. I have a nice Scottish accent as you can tell, but I'm actually, I'm based down in Western Australia, down under and yeah, so I do personal branding. I work with professionals, but I do a lot of work with athletes and it's about trying to get them ready for off field activities. What happens once they retire if injury hits because it's very easy to get caught up in, you know , the athlete life you style and your full force into that, which you should because that's your passion. But what happens afterwards because you don't have, I mean, maybe if you're a golfer, you've got a kind of longer career there, but most of us, if we're athletes, we're going to be retiring and our sort of mid thirties and we still got vast amount of time in front of us. So what are we going to do after that? So the way we position ourselves while we're still on the field is really important. So that's what I work on.

Kristian Weaver:

And what led you to be coming or taking up that profession? Like what you're doing at the moment?

Megan MacNeill:

I worked for not-for-profits and small businesses and my background is in marketing, but because I'd been working in not-for-profit space, there's never been that much money. So it's always been a lack of money. So you've had to be a little bit creative about how you market the organization. And I just over the years I've found that the easiest way to be able to do that was through the CEO or the chair or the president, whoever the authority figure within the organization was to be able to try and position them and get a platform for them that was obvious. That worked much better for the organization than any ads I could ever buy. And I wasn't really aware of it at the time, but what I was doing was building up personal brands for these individuals. So when I decided to start my own business, I was doing outsource marketing for small businesses, not-for-profits, and it just naturally kind of evolved that it was personal branding and I sort of decided to just label it what it was. And then I decided that it wasn't just organizations that I could help. It was individuals. So it started with corporates, especially young females that were looking for promotions. So you work on their personal brands to try and elevate them and put them in the right position for any opportunities that come up. And then I was also working with athletes and I would be working with them more in the side of when I was working for not for profits, having them come and speak. They would be speakers and they would be like a draw card for whatever event I had. And then I started looking at, you know , the ones that we were wanting to get if they were still playing, there was an obvious reason why we wanted them, because they were still in the spotlight and some of the ones that were retired that we wanted to speak, they either had um, something tying them to that organization. So I worked quite a bit in agriculture, so there were maybe from a farming background, so that was their tie to come back in and speak to us or it was that they were working on something that was really relevant to the group of people we were working with. And that was a paid opportunity for them, but they were also making money outside of obviously that one gig coming in and speaking to my group . So it just got me thinking about how they position themselves. Yet you have a look around and there's lots of sportsmen that just disappeared because you know, they just, once they retired, that is it for them. So it was just to kind of see, you know, some people want that, some people want to go back to um, you know, have other plans. But some people do want to kind of continue their career and it's looking at what that looks like once they're off the field.

Kristian Weaver:

Great. And then thinking about that branding, what can that do for an individual or for a business by having all this branding and having you work with them?

Megan MacNeill:

Yeah, so basically , like a personal brand, any kind of brand, someone has one anyway. If you're talking about personal brand, you as an individual has one. It's just whether or not you develop it and work it and actually give people something to talk about. So if you've got an example of two people, you know, we've got Mark... Mark decides that he doesn't want a personal brand. He doesn't want people talking about him. But the reality is people are still talking about Mark. It's just that what they see is completely wrong because Mark's not giving them any information to work with. Whereas Tom over here, he's decided to give out some information about who he is, and he's only given about 30% of his life. It's not his whole life. He's just giving out the bits that he wants you to know about. People are still talking about him as well, but they are a little bit more accurate because they've got some content to go on. So basically you've got no control over your personal brand. Your personal brand is whatever someone thinks or feels or says about you when you're not in the room. But you do have some influence over what it is that they do see, feel, and talk about once you're not there. So that's the important part about personal branding.

:

Fantastic. So obviously this podcast is based around sports therapists. So what the sports therapists need to know about branding their own businesses or branding themselves in order to make sure that the right perceptions are made? Yeah. So it doesn't matter what business you're in, but sports therapists in particular, because that's such a um , you know, personal, you know , you're working one on one with people there to be able to help them and you're helping them with situations. Well they're really personal. So that's the difference between maybe being able to play sports at the weekend or you know, if they work nine to five, being able to play with their kids. It doesn't, you know, it depends what level, but it is personal to them because nobody wants to be stuck indoors all the time. Do they? Um , so the difference between you and your competitor is you, you know, on paper, you and your competitor that's in the shop next door, you might have the same experience. You've got this, you went to the same uni, you've got the same qualifications, you've been doing it for the same amount of time. Everything on paper is the exact same. The only difference will be you. So being able to actually put yourself out there and tell people what , what problem you're solving is a massive difference. And also you've got to remember that you're not actually selling a service. No one's ever selling a service or a product. Your service, you're selling a solution. So what you're doing is you're either taking away pain or you're providing pleasure. So in your case, I mean I'm not a therapist, but I would presume that you are generally taking away pain so that people can then go and enjoy the pleasure of which is their sports, etc. .Excellent. So in terms of actionable steps that a sports therapist can take to improve their branding, what could they be doing on a day to day basis?

Megan MacNeill:

Um , first off would just be to have a look at who exactly they are trying to help you know, you when you talk to everyone you talk to no one. So is there a particular type of person that you're wanting to speak to? Is it a rugby player? Is a football player, is it someone plays golf? Is it someone who does yoga? What sport i s it? They do? Are they male? Are they female? And you need to really know who it is you're trying to help. In order to be able to speak to them, everyone else will come. But once y ou're actually speaking to that one person and you can attract them, it just makes everything that you do so much easier. U m, and you also need to be like, it's not for everyone. Like personal branding is hard. Like it's easy in the sense that personal branding is an extension of you. So it's just you showing up. But it is really hard to show up because once you do that, you're putting yourself out there for j udgment or that's what it feels like. And you'd be surprised how many people are behind you and supporting you, but you're always a little bit dubious about that. But yeah, my biggest tip would be just put yourself out there, p ut your face behind what it is you're doing and know who is that you're actually speaking to on it.

:

Are sports therapists required to be across all social platforms or are there specific ones that they should be looking at working on at this moment in time?

Megan MacNeill:

No, nobody should be on every single platform. That's a job in itself. Like, if you're running a business, if you are, if it is actually your business and you're having to work a full day in your business as well, being able to maintain every single social media platform is, that's not important. It's impossible. Um, I mean, I do that for people and that's a full time job in itself. You just can't and you can't be everything to everyone. And also your personality doesn't suit every platform. Like by all means, get on everything and see what works. You know, do a podcast, do a YouTube channel, get tik tok. You know, I m ean, I 've seen some great examples in tik tok recently o r chiropractors that have been hilarious and psychologists and stuff that, you know, anyone can go i n any of these platforms. Instagram, Facebook, I mean, everyone's got a Facebook page. I think you just have to have one of them, even if it's stagnant, because if you're not on Facebook, do you exist? U m, but to be able to maintain one that you're actually active on, pick one or two because there's no way that you can do justice to all of them because you c an't. U m, if you're making a piece of content, you can repurpose it to go o n different platforms, but you can't put o ut the exact same content. So find some wherever you like using. So you're comfortable there. Start there. A nd number two, going back to what we just talked about, where you know, who i s y ou're actually trying to attract, is it that rugby player, the yoga professional, you know, who h as it, y ou're actually attracting, where do they hang out, where do they consume their information? Because wherever they are is where you need to be.

Kristian Weaver:

And in that respect do we use hashtags on our branding and if we use the hashtag to that , does that get seen more often in different places?

Megan MacNeill:

Yeah. Uh, yeah. Hashtags are important on most platforms. Instagram in particular, it's always good to just make sure if you, if you do, if you search in the search bar, you genuinely can see how many people are actually using it. You don't want to use one that's too crowded, but you don't want to use one that's got like two posts on it either. So it's trying to get that happy medium, but you've got like you can use 20 different hashtags in there and find something that works, use your local area. Um , so for me, I use hashtag perth business cause that's my area. I use women in business for some of my things because that's what I'm doing as well. So again, if you're attracting, you know, a professional female that enjoys yoga and you're treating her so that she's able to be able to do yoga, well maybe she does a lot of bikram yoga or something. Um, then yes, you're gonna need to be where her where she is and you need to be using hashtags that she's going to be using. So they might be yoga as opposed to physiotherapy because people don't always know they're looking for you until they're looking for you, if that makes sense. Some platforms don't use it as much. I mean, Facebook you don't really need it. Um, but LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, they've all got their hashtags, so yeah, they definitely help.

Kristian Weaver:

Thanks. I think you've given us some really a lot of food for thought there because as sports therapists we are often our brand. We are, we often go by our name to practice. We often, if we are seeing people on a one to one basis , it depends upon what the current pandemic and the circumstances around it. So that's really important if we want it to find out a little bit more about branding and more about you, Megan, where would we go to?

Megan MacNeill:

If you go to my website, which is www.relevantbusiness.com.au or you can find me on social media if you put in Megan McNeil or relevant Megan, I come up as as well. So yeah, normally floating about there and I'm happy to answer any, any questions that you have.

Kristian Weaver:

That's excellent because I'll put all the links on the show notes as well so the members of the sports therapy community can find all that information and easily access you as well. So thanks very much for speaking to us. Is it absolute pleasure, and you've given us some really important points to have a look at in the future.

Megan MacNeill:

Thank you so much. I enjoyed that. It was great.

Kristian Weaver:

Join the most powerful and professional network specifically for sports therapists. Visit sportstherapycommunity.co.uk